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Courtney Bowers

Title: Columnist

Recent Work

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: Madapple by Christina Meldrum Published 08/08/2011 at 11:16 a.m.

    Aslaug is a teenage girl with no identity other than she is the daughter of her mother, Maren. Aslaug and her mother live hidden away in a small, decrepit house in the wilderness of Maine. They never leave, other than ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: Exposed by Kimberly Marcus Published 07/11/2011 at midnight

    Liz is a photographer, a young girl who sees her world through snapshots. And those pictures are clear, in focus, and happy most of the time. Her family is supportive, her art teacher praises her camera skills, and her best ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: Dash and Lily’s Book of Dares by Rachel Cohn & David Levithan Published 06/13/2011 at 9:59 a.m.

    If you’ve read my book review column before, you know I’m a fan of juxtaposed story telling. And if you’ve read my column closely, you also know that when Rachel Cohn and David Levithan pair up as coauthors, I will ...

  • The Booshelf, A Teen Review: Matched by Ally Condie Published 05/09/2011 at 10:44 a.m.

    It’s about time someone wrote a dystopian novel for our generation. Ally Condie’s first novel of her planned series, “Matched,” certainly fills that void. For you avid classic literature readers out there, this book is “Twilight” meets Ayn Rand’s “Anthem.” ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Diving Bell and the Butterfly by Jean-Dominique Bauby Published 04/11/2011 at midnight

    Imagine being trapped inside your own body. You’re in complete paralysis; you cannot move nor speak; yet your mind is still fully functioning and desperate to communicate with the world. This may sound like the plotline for a horror movie ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Half-Life of Planets by Emily Franklin and Brendan Halpin Published 03/14/2011 at 10:01 a.m.

    Liana is a teenage science geek who has dedicated her summer vacation to studying space and the stars rather than kissing boys, her previous addictive hobby. After receiving a rather negative label from her peers for her incessant flings, Liana ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: Sybil by Flora Rheta Schreiber Published 02/14/2011 at 11:31 a.m. 1 Comment

    Most people have probably watched, or at the very least heard of, the 1976 movie “Sybil.” In fact, if you have a few mood swings, someone may actually refer to you as Sybil, the woman with sixteen personalities. This extreme ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Explosionist by Jenny Davidson Published 01/10/2011 at midnight

    Let me begin by saying that before you read “The Explosionist,” you must understand the context and the setting of the story. I spent a hundred-odd pages attempting to decipher exactly what era my imagination was venturing off to until ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Published 12/13/2010 at 11:23 a.m.

    “The Bluest Eye” is a book that has been banned from many schools and libraries due to its controversial nature. Yes, this book is graphic, and it contains a story that most authors would be too afraid to tell, but ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald Published 11/29/2010 at midnight

    “The Great Gatsby” is one of those books that teachers start mentioning at the beginning of high school, one of those that you know you should probably read at some point in your life. So when I discovered that this ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Awakening by Kate Chopin Published 10/18/2010 at 4:15 p.m.

    As I continue to explore literature’s classics, I am constantly surprised by how relevant the stories are, even centuries later. This is certainly the case with Kate Chopin’s masterpiece, “The Awakening.” Written in 1899, Chopin creates a poignant tale of ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner Published 10/11/2010 at midnight

    When I was assigned to read a timeless novel by a classic writer for my English class, I chose William Faulkner. Why? He’s supposed to be one of the most influential Southern writers of the twentieth century; he even won ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: Taken By Storm by Angela Morrison Published 09/13/2010 at midnight

    Leesie is a good girl: intelligent, studious, and devoted to her Mormon religion. She plays by the rules, forbidding herself to fall in love with a non-Mormon or have sex until marriage. She dreams of leaving her small town, where ...

  • The Bookself, A Teen Review: Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë Published 08/09/2010 at 11:18 a.m.

    If you’ve taken a high school English course, I’m sure you’ve all groaned after one glance at the summer reading list. The dread of actually cracking open the covers has been hanging over your head since June. But June passed, ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Hanging Woods by Scott Loring Sanders Published 07/12/2010 at 10:24 a.m.

    Growing up in a southern town in the mid-seventies, 14-year-old Walter and his two mischievous best friends, Jimmy and Mothball, spend most of their time sneaking out at night and playing down by the river. They are particularly interested in ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: Write naked by Peter Gould Published 06/21/2010 at 12:12 p.m.

    Sixteen-year-old Victor is not a typical teenage boy. Instead of spending his time playing video games or causing trouble with friends, he prefers to live life “under the radar,” hoping to remain unnoticed by the rest of the world. While ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides Published 06/14/2010 at 6 a.m.

    It all began with one sister. Cecilia Lisbon, the youngest and certainly oddest of the five Lisbon girls, attempted suicide in her family’s bathroom. Until that one act, the Lisbons had been viewed as the most beautiful girls in the ...

  • Entrepreneurial enterprise Published 06/14/2010 at 6 a.m.

    At the ripe age of 24, when many are still trying to figure out what to do with their lives, Maryville native Brett Smuckler’s writing career has taken off. SynergEbooks published Smuckler’s first novel, “Under the Same Sky,” in April ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: Under the Same Sky by Brett Smuckler Published 05/10/2010 at 2:13 p.m.

    “Under the Same Sky” is the story of two friends whose love is overpowered by their opposite goals in life. Olivia meets Emmett when she is in kindergarten, and they spend all of their childhood years together, playing in the ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky Published 04/12/2010 at 10:15 a.m.

    It is Charlie’s freshman year of high school, and he doesn’t quite know where he belongs. He has never fit in with any of the kids his own age because he is so shy and timid. However, Charlie has a ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Loser’s Guide to Life and Love by A.E. Cannon Published 03/08/2010 at 10:43 a.m.

    Ed McIff is your typical teenage dork, a guy who never knows what to say to girls and wears a tuxedo and bow tie to his job at Reel Life Movies. According to Ed, no one of the opposite sex ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: Ordinary Ghosts by Eireann Corrigan Published 02/08/2010 at 10:14 a.m.

    Emil has always lived in the shadows of others. His older brother, Ethan, was the popular guy at Caramoor, the private prep school they attend. No matter what Ethan did, he always made it look effortless, and Emil feels that ...

  • The Bookshelf, A Teen Review: The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman Published 01/11/2010 at 1 p.m.

    “The Golden Compass,” the first novel in Philip Pullman’s “His Dark Materials” series, introduces readers to another world that is quite similar to ours. The difference is that people in this world have external souls that take on an animal ...

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