New Maryville teachers welcomed at annual breakfast

New teachers for Maryville City Schools welcomed at the new teacher breakfast included Tracy Poulsen (Maryville High), Erin West(Maryville Intermediate), Alicia West (Maryville Intermediate), Elizabeth Albright (Maryville High), Jessica Gooch (Foothills Elementary), Brynn Dailey (Maryville Middle), Channing Lodari (Maryville Intermediate); second row, Matthew Kelley (Maryville Intermediate), Allyson Finck (Maryville Middle), Megahn Cook (John Sevier Elementary), Adrenne Miller (Sam Houston Elementary), Lindsey Pacifico (Maryville High), Marykay Jackson (Maryville Intermediate), Jessica Hooker (Maryville High), Stephanie Reed (Maryville Middle), Emily Jackson (Foothills Elementary), Wesley Miller (Maryville Intermediate), Greg Roach (Maryville High), Brandon Waters (Maryville High), Kyle Harris (Maryville Middle) and Rosanna Giles (Maryville High).

Photo by Jolanda Jansma

New teachers for Maryville City Schools welcomed at the new teacher breakfast included Tracy Poulsen (Maryville High), Erin West(Maryville Intermediate), Alicia West (Maryville Intermediate), Elizabeth Albright (Maryville High), Jessica Gooch (Foothills Elementary), Brynn Dailey (Maryville Middle), Channing Lodari (Maryville Intermediate); second row, Matthew Kelley (Maryville Intermediate), Allyson Finck (Maryville Middle), Megahn Cook (John Sevier Elementary), Adrenne Miller (Sam Houston Elementary), Lindsey Pacifico (Maryville High), Marykay Jackson (Maryville Intermediate), Jessica Hooker (Maryville High), Stephanie Reed (Maryville Middle), Emily Jackson (Foothills Elementary), Wesley Miller (Maryville Intermediate), Greg Roach (Maryville High), Brandon Waters (Maryville High), Kyle Harris (Maryville Middle) and Rosanna Giles (Maryville High).

New teachers for the Maryville City School System may have studied their handbooks, but school board member Charles West threw some new rules at them on Friday morning.

West was the keynote speaker for the annual new teachers’ breakfast, held in the commons area of Maryville High School.

In addressing the teachers, West said every job comes with unwritten rules, and gave 10 rules the teachers should remember.

• “If Blount County Schools are out for inclement weather, it doesn’t matter. If tanks are rolling down Broadway, we dismiss at noon.”

• “At Maryville, there is a Maryville way of doing things. That which works, we keep; that which doesn’t, we don’t. It’s a mix of experience and innovation.”

• “From now on, you’ll be known as a Maryville City School teacher.”

• “Seek out friendships with long-term teachers. It builds a sense of community.”

• “Pray often.”

• “Every kid deserves a shot at the American dream. See what you can do to help them.”

• “It is Maryville, not Murvil. Baltimore is in Maryland, not MARYland.”

• “Show your support. Buy game day gear for Maryville High School, even if you don’t teach at the high school. We think we can beat anyone on any given day.”

• “Enjoy the moment.”

• “Don’t sweat the small stuff.”

West concluded with, “With all the demands, it is still the most rewarding job.”

Maryville City Schools Director Stephanie Thompson led the event. Thompson said this time of year is special. “It is kind of like start of a new year,” she said. “It’s a new beginning. You look back on the previous year and whatever you needed to improve on, you look forward to making those improvements. It is always exciting to see the new teachers,” she said.

Tom Stinnett with the Maryville Education Association said the standards are high for Maryville teachers. “For new teachers, the expectations are big. We’re proud of you,” he told the gathering. “MEA is excited to be part of your life, too.”

Maelea Galyon, assistant principal at Maryville High School, said this was a special year for her. “It’s the first time we’ve hired people I taught,” she said. “It is fun to see these kids you watched grow up decide to come into this field.”

Greg Roach, new principal at Maryville High School, said he was a little nervous as he took on a new job in a new system. He was principal at West High School before coming to Maryville. Roach said he has had a good transition. “I do have to thank the whole committee,” he said. “The relationship has been great.”

Jessica Hooker, special education teacher at Maryville High School, is a Maryville native and said she’s proud to be on staff. “I was born and raised here and graduated Maryville High School. I wanted to be part of something I believed in,” she said. “It’s a great system.”

Rosanna Giles, a new marketing teacher at Maryville High School, did her student teaching at the high school and both of her children attend schools in the system. “The system is phenomenal,” she said. “The teachers care for and love the students.”

Beth Albright, English teacher at Maryville High School, said she is a Knoxville native, but she’s ready to become part of Maryville. “I’m excited about the community and the opportunities here,” she said. “I’ve been impressed with the teachers, and I’m looking forward to learning more about Maryville football.”

Brandon Waters will teach drivers education and coach football. “Maryville is my alma mater, and this is definitely an opportunity to teach in a great system,” he said. “It is definitely a good opportunity to work with Mrs. Thompson and Coach (George) Quarles. This is a tremendous system.”

Lindsey Pacifico is teaching special education at Maryville High School. “I’m honored and grateful to be part of a great system,” she said.

Vice Mayor Andy White greeted the teachers and encouraged them to keep high standards. “This is one of the finest school systems in the state,” he said. “A lot of hard work goes into making this system what it is today.”

School board chair Christi Sayles said educators make the biggest difference. “It is the teacher in the classroom,” she said. “Sometimes you will be the only person who cares about that child.”

School board member Bethany Pope expressed gratitude for all that the teachers do. “Thank you for everything you do,” she said.

Councilman Tommy Hunt said he spoke recently with a Maryville High School graduate who works at his company and is working to earn an MBA. “He recalled a teacher at Maryville High School who frustrated him,” Hunt said. “As he was getting his MBA, he realized what she taught him helped him succeed. As a teacher, it is better to be trusted than to be loved.”

Sponsors for the event included Aubrey’s Restaurant, Ingram, Overholt and Bean P.C., AlcoaTenn Federal Credit Union and the Cafeteria staff at Maryville High School.

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