Restoration project comes to Great Smoky Mountains National Park

A new restoration project is coming to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park this Saturday that will help minimize pollution.

The National Parks Project - a partnership between the National Parks Conservation Association and Nature Valley - will be partnering with the Foothills Land Conservancy to remove invasive, non-native plant species, and re-planting native trees and shrubs along a nearby creek to help minimize pollution and creek sedimentation entering the park.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is one of six national parks that will benefit from this project. The Smokies, one of America’s most visited and beloved parks, suffers from degraded air quality. Beginning in August and continuing through October, local NPCA employees and volunteers will be eliminating invasive, non-native plant species and planting native trees and shrubs along a nearby creek of the park to help minimize pollution and creek sedimentation.

Local residents and volunteers interested in learning more about the project, plan on attending the event set for 8:30 a.m. to noon on Saturday Aug. 27 at the Happy Valley area close to the Abrams Creek Ranger Station.

This is a volunteer project focused on stream bank restoration of waters that flow into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park providing for improved aquatic habitat and protection of aquatic species in the stream, in the Park and downstream.

The National Parks Project, launched by Nature Valley in April 2010, helps support the National Parks Conservation Association’s efforts to preserve America’s national parks.

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