Lifesaver Luau brings folks out to support Secret Safe Place

This year’s Lifesaver Luau team of Lisa Yount, Spencer Beaty, Nichole McCord, Dawn Herring and Shannon McCloud pose by the waterfall as the evening draws to a close.

Photo by Jolanda Jansma

This year’s Lifesaver Luau team of Lisa Yount, Spencer Beaty, Nichole McCord, Dawn Herring and Shannon McCloud pose by the waterfall as the evening draws to a close.

The seventh annual Lifesaver Luau drew a crowd to the Beach at Court South on Aug. 13 for a Saturday evening of fun for a great cause.

The luau supports A Secret Safe Place for Newborns of Tennessee and matched 2010 in terms of the amount of money raised and the number of folks who showed up, executive director Shannon McCloud said.

“We had a good crowd, and the weather was good. We were afraid it was going to rain,” she said. “There were almost 200 people who joined in the fun, so it was about the same number of participants as last year, but it was less than previous years.”

Final figures weren’t available on Monday but McCloud said planners are optimistic. “We hope to raise close to $10,000,” she said. “It is our largest fundraiser each year.”

McCloud said conditions were right for a pleasant event. “The weather wasn’t quite as hot as it has been, so everybody seemed to have a good time, and the kids really had a good time,” she said. “They really enjoyed all the games, and there was a lot of laughing going on.”

Sponsors for the event included Court South, Sonny’s Barbecue, WBIR, B-97.5, Blount Today, Knoxville News Sentinel, Print Edge, Campbell Tent and Party Rentals, DesignSensory and GoTeez.

“Adriel McCord was our DJ, and he took over the master of ceremony duties. We also had Alana Seaton. She and her husband, Joel, played guitar and sang,” McCloud said. “Alana grew up in Hawaii. It was nice to have authentic Hawaiian music. Adam Loo played the ukulele.”

A Secret Safe Place for Newborns of Tennessee was founded in 2001 to promote the Safe Haven Law after an abandoned newborn died of severe dehydration in Townsend. The law protects mothers who are unwilling or unable to care for their newborns by allowing them to surrender their babies to any hospital, community health clinic, birthing center, walk-in clinic, EMS facility or 24-hour fire or police station within 72 hours of the newborns birth.

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