Denso Manufacturing Tennessee receives state safety award

Lee Cutshaw, crane operator at Denso, demonstrates how a  crane is safely used to move a 3,000 pound dye in the injectedable molding area.

Lee Cutshaw, crane operator at Denso, demonstrates how a crane is safely used to move a 3,000 pound dye in the injectedable molding area.

Denso Manufacturing Tennessee, Inc., in Maryville recently won the Commissioners Award of Excellence for Workplace Safety.

The award was announced by Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development Commissioner James Neeley. The commissioner presented the award on Wednesday, Aug. 4, at the 33rd Annual Tennessee Safety and Health Congress held at the Embassy Suites Hotel and Conference Center in Murfreesboro.

“Denso Manufacturing Tennessee, Incorporated has demonstrated strong commitment to maintaining a safe and healthy workplace,” said Neeley, who presented the Commissioner’s Award of Excellence to the company today. “The evaluation criteria for this award are challenging, and this company has worked extremely hard to meet and exceed the standards the award requires.”

The Commissioner’s Award honors Tennessee employers and their employees who together have achieved a required number of hours worked without experiencing a lost workday case and have maintained total injury and illness incidence rates below the national average. The number of required hours is based on the size of the company.

The Denso Manufacturing Tennessee, Inc. operation employs more than 2,600 people manufacturing a wide variety of advanced components and systems for the automotive industry. The Maryville location has qualified for the Commissioner’s Award by working nearly 1.5 million hours without a lost-time injury. The company’s three-year incident rate average is 74.4 percent below Denso’s industry average. This is the second consecutive year that Denso has received this award.

During a tour of the injectable molding portion of the plant, crane operator Lee Cutshaw used a crane to show how associates safely move a 3,000 pound dye for a Ford Econoline van.

Joe Talley, safety specialist, said before associates use the equipment they must go through a class, train with someone who is experienced using the crane and also must have appropriate safety attire. “Actually doing the job is the easiest part. Its’ getting training and learning property procedures so that we prevent injuries through good training, good supervision and good work procedures.”

© 2010 blounttoday.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Discuss
  • Print

Comments » 0

Be the first to post a comment!

Features