Summer work program connects teachers to Smokies resources

Balch oversees students as they work on an archaeology project.

Photo courtesy of the National Park Service

Balch oversees students as they work on an archaeology project.

Miller uses an artifact to demonstrate technique to her archaeology students.

Photo courtesy of the National Park Service

Miller uses an artifact to demonstrate technique to her archaeology students.

Park Ranger Jennifer Miller, a high school science teacher at Gatlinburg Pittman High School,  conducts a Junior Ranger program on archaeology.

Photo courtesy of the National Park Service

Park Ranger Jennifer Miller, a high school science teacher at Gatlinburg Pittman High School, conducts a Junior Ranger program on archaeology.

Balch oversees students as they work on an archaeology project.

Photo courtesy of the National Park Service

Balch oversees students as they work on an archaeology project.

Park Ranger Sharon Balch, a 6th-8th grade science teacher from Jones Cove Elementary School,  conducts an archaeology program for Junior Rangers.

Photo courtesy of the National Park Service

Park Ranger Sharon Balch, a 6th-8th grade science teacher from Jones Cove Elementary School, conducts an archaeology program for Junior Rangers.

A recent educational grant provided by the Alcoa Community Foundation through the Friends of the Smokies is supporting a 6-week paid work experience for teachers in Great Smoky Mountains National Park this summer. A pilot program was developed by the Park’s Resource Education Division that emulates the National Park Service’s (NPS) Teacher to Ranger to Teacher program, serving to enhance learning and students’ appreciation for parks.

Each Tuesday through Friday through July 31, Sevier County science teachers Casey Berg from Wearwood Elementary, Jennifer Miller from Gatlinburg-Pittman High School, and Sharon Balch from Jones Cove Elementary are donning a Park Ranger uniform and working along side Park employees in the field and in the office. They are obtaining a wide range of knowledge and developing new skills through on-the-job experiences dealing with resource management activities and visitor/children’s programs.

The teacher-rangers are performing a variety of duties including conducting Junior Ranger programs for kids ages 5-12 with Resource Educators; learning scientific methods by surveying aquatic species and stream habitats and collecting air quality monitoring data with Natural Resource Specialists; and helping Cultural Resource Managers catalogue recently found archeological artifacts. They are also assisting in enhancing the K-8 grade Parks as Classrooms (PAC) program curriculum for elementary and middle schools and developing new curriculum to expand the PAC program into high school. During this assignment, Park employees benefit from the teachers’ expertise to learn better ways to reach students.

Participating teacher-rangers bring the parks into the school system. “They will draw from their lessons learned and be better equipped to develop ‘curricula enhancers’ for use in the classroom,” said Chief of Resource Education Cathleen Cook. “In turn other educators in the school districts will benefit by sharing these new teaching tools and students will share in the enthusiasm of a teacher who has had the opportunity to be a National Park Ranger,” Cook continued.

Another feature of this mutually beneficial relationship is that during National Park Week, a Presidential proclaimed recognition of National Parks held annually in April, teacher-rangers will wear their NPS uniforms to school to help celebrate national parks and focus on assignments related to Great Smoky Mountains National Park, nature’s outdoor classroom.

© 2009 blounttoday.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

  • Discuss
  • Print

Comments » 0

Be the first to post a comment!

Features